The Collections

Are your e-books compatible with the Kindle?

Overdrive e-books and e-audiobooks can now be used on a Kindle Fire (earlier Kindle models are not compatible). Simply download the Overdrive app.

What e-reader or tablet device should I buy?

Library staff members are not able to suggest a specific reader or tablet as it depends on personal preference and how you want to use the device. 
Most devices are compatible with Bolinda items. However, Overdrive has more specific requirements. To access a list of compatible devices, please visit the Overdrive help link.
Overdrive e-books and e-audiobooks can now be used on a Kindle Fire (earlier Kindle models are not compatible). Simply download the Overdrive app.

I am having trouble downloading an e-book/audio book ...

Overdrive and Bolinda websites have excellent help screens.
For problems with Overdrive, visit this link
For problems with Bolinda, visit this link then log-in to access the help screen.

Can I download an e-book on a library PC?

Titles can be borrowed using a library PC but must be downloaded/synced to a device. The Overdrive Download Station located at Mill Park library allows patrons to download directly to that library PC.
There are some titles in the Overdrive collection called Overdrive Read which can be read on a PC (including a library PC). Remember to adhere to PC booking times, if you wish to read a title in the library.

Why do US and UK libraries have e-book titles that don’t appear in your catalogue?

Many publishers also impose geographical rights restrictions on their published titles. Unfortunately, a publisher may allow an e-book to be sold to a library in the United States but impose a restriction on the sale of that title to Australian libraries.

Why aren’t there more new releases available in e-book format?

Licensing terms of e-books to libraries vary among publishers. Many of the larger publishers impose strict limitations on the types of material libraries can purchase through their e-book vendors. 

The big 6 publishers became the big 5 on July 1 when Penguin merged with Random House. The publishers are:  Hachette, HarperCollins, Macmillan, Penguin Random House and Simon & Schuster.
These publishers each have different approaches to selling e-book titles to libraries and impose different conditions. Many smaller publishers, on the other hand, are content to sell their e-books to libraries.
Some of the restrictions imposed by the larger publishers include a substantial increase in the price of an e-book for a library compared to the price of the same book to the consumer and loan limits on titles. i.e., a title can be loaned 26 times and then it will be withdrawn from the collection.
The Australian Library and Information Association is actively pursuing a viable solution for all concerned – libraries, publishers, authors.
Their most recent issues paper can be accessed here.
IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions) advocates for all libraries world-wide. They are working at an international level with WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organisation) on copyright and exceptions.
For information about IFLA’s e-lending principles, please visit this link.

Why do I need to place a hold for an e-book/e-audiobook if it is out on loan?

Most digital material offered by our suppliers is licensed from the publishers and therefore is subject to restrictions imposed by the publishers. Licensing agreements and DRM (Digital Rights Management) usually mean that a title can be loaned by one patron at a